What does ABA Intervention Involve?

What to expect?

At ASD Community Support we aim to partner with families over the long haul, journeying alongside autistic children and their parents to teach them not only academics but also other important life skills.

We do this by addressing what we call “The Big 3”.

  • Lowering problem behaviours to near zero
  • Teaching children to request wants and needs
  • Teaching children independent self-care skills

We help lower problem behaviours

​Children with autism/developmental delays have different levels of problem behaviours.

These challenging behaviours get in the way of your child’s learning and social life, so it is very important we address them swiftly.

If your child exhibits challenging behaviours such as:

  • Tantrums
  • Aggression
  • Non-compliance/Not Following
  • Directions
  • Stereotypy
  • Repetitive Behaviours
  • Stimming/Scripting
  • Rigidity
  • Failure to Initiate
  • Absence of Play
  • Failure to Recognise Social
  • Boundaries

Do not worry, we are able to help.

The Most Fundamental Social Skill

Problem behaviours usually occur in children and adults most commonly when they are unable to make their wants and needs known.

Unfortunately, autistic children often lack this most fundamental of social skills.

Whether seeking a tangible item, attention, comfort, stimulation, or even information, ASD Community Support believes autistic children can and need to be taught the skills to access these.

Independence is paramount

At ASD Community Support, we are interested not only in the immediate needs of your children at school or preschool but also the independency of your child in the long term.

We believe that with proper and expert programming, autistic children can learn the skills to independently care for themselves.

From toileting, grooming, dressing, sleeping, pre-vocational to leisure and play skills, ASD Community Support is here to support you and your child.

Unfortunately, autistic children often lack this most fundamental of social skills.

Whether seeking a tangible item, attention, comfort, stimulation, or even information, ASD Community Support believes autistic children can and need to be taught the skills to access these.